That’s All Folks

Our last two puppies found a home today. Thank you again to all our new puppy owners. We love getting feedback on what you’ve named them and updated photos. I think I’ll be setting up a ‘brag’ page on facebook for you to post photos of your new fur babies.

nov 1st

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Top Two

Black boy and Light Pink girl are the two puppies left as of today, October 27th. They turn 14 weeks old today as well and they’ve had two sets of shots so far. On Sunday, Black weighed 33lbs and Light Pink was 37lbs.

Here are some new photos I took this morning.

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Black

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Light Pink

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Black

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Posing for me

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Light Pink is a horse!

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Sweet!

They’ve been living with a young sheep for the past three weeks and they are all getting along very well. They have also learned about electric fences and are just starting to get out more often in our common area where the poultry is. We’ve started a little training on the word, “Come” and they are beginning to learn “Leave It”. They are such quick learners at this age.

 

If you’d like to see the parents or the original ad please click here.

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Puppy Update

There are four puppies left. They turned 10 weeks this last Tuesday.  Now that they are getting older we are seeing their personalities emerging. They are also getting individual leash time as we’ve been going out and meeting the farm animals.

We are finding Purple Girl to be outgoing. She’s not shy and learned quickly to walk with me on the leash.

Here is a couple new photos of Purple girl:

Purple Girl - 10 wks

Purple Girl – 10 wks

Purple Girl -10wks

Purple Girl -10wks

Yellow Girl is driven to please. She is very friendly.

Yellow Girl -10 wks

Yellow Girl -10 wks

Yellow Girl-10 weeks

Yellow Girl-10 weeks

Black Boy is very calm and laid back. He is first, however, to respond to “go check things out” and is already guarding his little area. He is not as outgoing with people initially as his sisters but if you wait for him, he proves to be very sweet.

Black Boy -10 wks

Black Boy -10 wks

Black Boy -10 weeks

Black Boy -10 weeks

The fourth one we still have is Light Pink Girl. She is incredibly sweet and friendly. She has short hair and I just want to bring her in the house and cuddle her.

Light Pink Girl -10wks

Light Pink Girl -10wks

Light Pink Girl -10 wks

Light Pink Girl -10 wks

The pups are $600 each and have had their first shots. Deposits are no longer necessary as they are ready to go now.

To see their parents (who we have on site) or for more information you can also view the original ad here:  https://redcabinfarm.com/2015/08/02/livestock-guardian-dogs-for-sale/

Posted in Livestock Guardian Dogs | 2 Comments

Six Puppies Left

The puppies turned 8 weeks old this last Tuesday. They have all had their first set of shots and are ready for their new homes. We have placed 4 so far and we are hearing great things from the new owners. The top comments are about their calm temperaments and intelligence.

If you are interested in getting in touch with us you can view the original ad here.

8 weeks

Light Pink girl

8 weeks

Yellow girl

8 weeks

Purple girl

8 weeks

Black boy

8 weeks

Green boy

8 weeks

Orange girl

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Pups are almost 5 weeks!

Here’s a little gallery of updated puppy photos. If you would like to view the full ad, click this link:  Livestock Guardian Dogs For Sale

We also have a video that you can view:  

Posted in Happenings, Livestock Guardian Dogs | Tagged , , | 1 Comment

Puppy Portraits

male, dark blue, 3 weeks

male, green, 3 weeks

male, light blue, 3 weeks old

male, black, 3 weeks

female, hot pink, 3 weeks

female, purple, 3 weeks

female, red, 3 weeks

female, yellow, 3 weeks

female, orange, 3 weeks

female, light pink, 3 weeks

Posted in Farm, Happenings, Livestock Guardian Dogs | 1 Comment

Go Big or Go Home?

I know it’s been a while. I’m sorry I haven’t posted in so long but I’ve been a tad bit overwhelmed.

Back in June we looked into purchasing a working farm of 40 acres or so. I drooled over all the pictures of the barn and other outbuildings, the green, fenced pastureland, the huge garden.

We have been trying to have our little operation make sense somehow. We finally got some wool made into yarn and while it was gorgeous, we just don’t have enough sheep to really produce a decent amount of product. So, we seriously considered buying that farm and trying to get into sheep farming. When we realized it wasn’t going to work out we just came to a point of re-evaluating everything we have going on here.

I was very ‘gung ho’ in the beginning of starting this little farm. All I wanted to do was grow more food. It’s not that I haven’t blissfully enjoyed almost all of it, but reality has hit.

First, you need grass. I certainly underestimated this. Yes, you can buy hay but I like to be practical. Our property is only a couple acres and the chickens, ducks and geese pretty much eat it all. We have been fortunate in that we’ve been able to use pasture at our neighbors. We use a portable fence and move it around every couple days or so.  The negative side is that my children and I are leading each animal across a road morning and night to get them fed. Frankly, I’m sick of it. I hate crossing that road.

You need money. Growing your own food is so much more expensive that I ever would have guessed. While we’ve been thrilled with the quality of food we’ve been eating, it has come at a high price.  That aspect has been quite discouraging. Have you ever done any sewing or building and you find out after that you could have bought it for less than it cost to make?

Also, you need time. We’ve been neglecting making much improvements on our home. We haven’t had the time or money.  We are not the kind of people who can stomach a big mortgage and so we like to improve as we go and do it ourselves. The house and property we have needs a lot of work.

You also need a lot of energy and ambition. I am not as ambitious of a person as I thought I was. I like to take my time and do things right. I don’t like being distracted. I also really don’t like when things pile up and I can’t find time to clear them off my list. I’ve been doing too many things to do anything really well.

I’ve been trying to clear up my priorities. Sometimes I find it really hard just to make it through the day. I need more headspace to focus on communicating to my children and husband that they are worthy of love. I need to get my budgeting back on track. I need to learn some time management so I don’t always feel that I’m in a rush. And I need time to relax!

I feel like someone who just woke up out of a fog and is looking around at all the projects and work I created and I am wondering who was this crazy person that started all this?

Things have come to a head. When stuff isn’t making sense anymore you look around and see what kind of changes you can make.  So, we’ve decided to sell off most of the livestock. We will keep a few until butcher time in the fall and we’ll keep our poultry (and of course our dogs).

Maybe in the future we’ll do some more “farming” but for now I am looking forward to taking a break.

PS I’m having a hard time posting this with no pictures at all so here’s a picture of some of the yarn we had made:

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Nidi yarn

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Livestock Guardian Dogs For Sale

This is the only litter we will be offering for sale. We have a pair of wonderful, working livestock guardians (featured in the first photo) and we’ve let them have one litter. We have a small farm of sheep, goats, geese, ducks and chickens. Our dogs guard all of them and us as we have a small acreage.

We purchased our dogs from a breeder in Port Angeles, WA. His goal was to mix breeds together to create a healthier, more socially well-rounded farm dog. The dogs we have are mostly a cross of Kangal and Boerboel. Kangals are the sheep guardians of Turkey and Boerboels are a general farm/family guardian from Africa. You can read more about them on this website: http://www.olympicdogs.net/post/559569980/kangal-x-boerboel

We have found our dogs to be outstanding at everything their breeder claimed. They are stable and calm around our livestock and our children. Their methods of guarding have been most welcome as they do not bark all night as most of the other popular breeds do.

They are just very pleasant dogs to have around. They very much enjoy coming in the house and hanging out with the family but do not complain when they are sent back outside to work.

The litter they have had consists of 10 puppies. 6 females (1 is spoken for) and 4 males. I expect them all to be fairly large as their dad is just over a year old and was 120 pounds and 30 inches a few months ago. Their mom is 24 inches and 80lbs and is full grown.

The puppies were born on July 21st and will be 8 weeks old on September 15th. They will have all their shots and be dewormed before being placed in their new homes. Pups will be available on September 12. A deposit of $100 is needed to secure a pup. Deposits have started coming in and the order they are received will establish the first come first serve basis for picking out your pup.

Please contact us to come and see the puppies or for any questions. We are located in Central Washington State. You can reply to this ad by email to redcabinfarm@gmail.com.

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Hugo, sire

Bersa, dam

Bersa, dam

Here’s a few links for videos in chronological order of the puppies:

Below are two videos of three of the female puppies taken on August 25th:

Here also is a link to a gallery of the most recent photos of the litter:

https://redcabinfarm.com/2015/08/23/pups-are-almost-5-weeks/

And lastly, here’s a link to the puppy portraits of them at three weeks old:  https://redcabinfarm.com/2015/08/10/puppy-portraits/

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Anatolian Shepherd Maremma Great Pyrenees Akbash Komondor Kuvasz Tibetan Mastiff

Posted in Farm, Livestock Guardian Dogs | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , | 10 Comments

The Sting of Failure: What NOT To Do With Bees.

No, I’m not going to apologize for my cheesy title. Is that a back-door way of apologizing? Anyway, failure hurts. It makes me feel sorta stupid and naive.

We attended one beekeepers meeting. One.

First lesson:  Don’t get bees if you don’t even have time for the meetings.

We did read some books and thought if we avoided a few of the obvious mistakes we’d be fine. Let me just tell you:  beekeeping is much harder than that. You really need the local bee club for help and support. Having a mentor in that club wouldn’t hurt either.

So, the short story of our unsuccessful season with bees was that we didn’t manage them properly. It is especially important during swarm season. In both our hives, the original queens left with more than half of the workers.

Second lesson: Don’t be greedy when you’re harvesting the honey.

I found the smallest hive dead after a cold snap at the end of November and I gave the frames of honey they had to the remaining hive. I found that hive dead this spring. So, I took all the frames of honey, read how to harvest it, and spun every single frame in the extractor.

Um, NO. Don’t do that.

You normally only harvest a frame of honey when its 90-95% full of capped honey. It should look like this:

photo courtesy of instructables.com

Not this:

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Since I did do that, I had a harvest of watery, uncured honey mixed in with some good, normal honey. It didn’t taste right and it didn’t look right either.

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At some point after I poured all this ‘honey’ into jars, I found out that I harvested honey that had too much water content and could potentially spoil. So, 1 3/4 gallons sat on my countertop for days and days while a busy weekend went by and I thought about what to do with it.

I researched “how to save your honey harvest when it’s too watery”. Nothing.

Finally, I skimmed the foam that had collected at the top of each jar and poured it into a large stock pot. There was sediment in the bottom of the jars, too and I tried to leave this behind and not be greedy this time.  I did, however, save a pint of the “raw nectar honey” to keep in the fridge. Part of the reason we got bees was because of the potential the honey had of helping my son with his hay fever allergies, so I wanted to save him some.

I heated the pot full of watery honey slowly on the lowest setting on the stove. I let this cook for almost 2 days. The level dropped maybe a half an inch to an inch. It now looked and tasted like honey. I took it off the heat and let it cool a little and then poured it into jars. I was left with a gallon and a half.

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We haven’t given up on keeping bees. They are fascinating and there needs to be more of them around. We, will, however, learn a little more before we get them again.

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Our First Lambs

Our Icelandic ewe, Nidi,  had twins yesterday afternoon. (This is a gallery so if you want to see the pictures larger just click on them.)

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